THE LIBERATOR – WM. LLOYD GARRISON, EDITOR – JULY 30, 1858

THE LIBERATOR – WM. LLOYD GARRISON, EDITOR – JULY 30, 1858

THE LIBERATOR. Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Editor. Vol. XXVII. No. 31. Boston, Friday, July 30, 1858. Whole Number, 1441. J.B. Yerrinton & Son, Printer. 4 pgs. with 6 columns each. William Lloyd Garrison (12/10/1805 – 5/24/1879) was an American abolitionist, journalist, suffragist and social reformer. He founded THE LIBERATOR along with Issac Knapp in 1831. In 1832 he organized the New England Anti-Slavery Society. As one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society he promoted “immediate emancipation” of slaves in the United States. In the first issue of THE LIBERATOR, Garrison wrote, “I am aware that many object to the severity of my language; but is there not cause for severity? I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation. No! No! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of the ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen;—but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present. I am in earnest—I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard. The apathy of the people is enough to make every statue leap from its pedestal, and to hasten the resurrection of the dead.” Paid subscription to THE LIBERATOR was always smaller than its circulation. In 1834 it had two thousand subscribers, three-fourths of whom were blacks. Benefactors paid to have the newspaper distributed to influential statesmen and public officials. Although Garrison rejected physical force as a means for ending slavery, his critics took his demand for immediate emancipation literally. Some believed he advocated the sudden and total freeing of all slaves, and considered him a dangerous fanatic. Nat Turner’s slave rebellion in Virginia just seven months after THE LIBERATOR started publication fueled the outcry against Garrison in the South. A North Carolina grand jury indicted him for distributing incendiary material, and the Georgia Legislature offered a $5,000 reward for his capture and conveyance to the state for trial. THE LIBERATOR gradually gained a large following in the northern states. By 1861 it had subscribers across the North, as well as in England, Scotland, and Canada. It was received in state legislatures, governor's mansions, Congress, and the White House. After the end of the Civil War and the abolition of slavery by the Thirteenth Amendment Garrison published the last issue (number 1,820) on December 29, 1865, writing a "Valedictory" column. After reviewing his long career in journalism and the cause of abolitionism, he wrote: “The object for which THE LIBERATOR was commenced—the extermination of chattel slavery—having been gloriously consummated, it seems to me specially appropriate to let its existence cover the historic period of the great struggle; leaving what remains to be done to complete the work of emancipation to other instrumentalities, (of which I hope to avail myself,) under new auspices, with more abundant means, and with millions instead of hundreds for allies.” (Portions from Wikipedia.) The issued being offered includes articles, many taken from other papers, concerning “Emancipation in Jamaica. Its Actual Results; Emancipation in the West Indies; New Publications, Meetings in Hancock and South Market, NH; Foreign Intelligence; Boston and Providence, New Bedford and Taunton, and Taunton Branch Railroads; editorials and upcoming lecture announcements, plus more. Very minor foxing, some minor toning, overall in vg cond.

$ 125.00
# 1768



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